No item elements found in rss feed.
bbc
No item elements found in rss feed.

News Analysis: Why Women Aren’t C.E.O.s, According to Women Who Almost Were

It’s not a pipeline problem. It’s about loneliness, competition and deeply rooted barriers.

President Trump’s Lies, the Definitive List

We have catalogued nearly every outright lie the president has told publicly since taking the oath of office.

Sean Spicer Resigns as White House Press Secretary

Mr. Spicer quit after telling President Trump he vehemently disagreed with the appointment of the financier Anthony Scaramucci as communications director.

The Checkup: With a Tick Boom, It’s Not Just Lyme Disease You Have to Fear

Everybody knows about Lyme. But other tick-borne diseases, including the Powassan virus, can cause lasting damage.

Op-Ed Contributor: We’ll Miss You, Sean Spicer

No one else could possibly convey the combination of chutzpah and shame that Mr. Spicer embodied.

Op-Ed Columnist: Health Care in a Time of Sabotage

Republicans are working hard to make Obamacare fail.

Are You a Carboholic? Why Cutting Carbs Is So Tough

Eating a little of a tasty dessert doesn’t satisfy me — it creates a fierce craving to eat it all, and then some.

Review: ‘Dunkirk’ Is a Tour de Force War Movie, Both Sweeping and Intimate

In his brilliant new film, Christopher Nolan revisits a harrowing, true World War II mission in a story of struggle, survival and resistance.

Op-Ed Columnist: Republicans Can’t Pass Bills

The G.O.P. used to be willing to govern. Not now.

Contributing Op-Ed Writer: The Men Who Never Have to Grow Up

Peter Pan, Donald Jr., Ryan Seacrest and the boys.

Market Snapshot: Stocks brace for volatility in earnings deluge; Fed meeting looms

With nearly a fifth of earnings reports out, investors are divided on how early corporate reports are serving as an indicator of the overall health of the U.S. economy, and that could contribute to a volatile week as stocks linger near record highs.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq post weekly gains as stock market finishes session lower

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq extend gains for a third week.

Market Snapshot: U.S. stocks slip as Home Depot drags on the Dow; Nasdaq closes at record

U.S. stocks finish mostly lower on Thursday as Home Depot weighed on the Dow but the Nasdaq bucked the trend to match its best win streak since February 2015 and closed at a record.

Market Snapshot: Stock-market benchmarks ring up records as Morgan Stanley fosters buying spirits

U.S. stock-index gauges on Wednesday carve out fresh all-time highs, with the Dow joining the S&P 500 and Nasdaq at records.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq close at records as tech shares lead

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq close at records on Tuesday as gains in tech stocks offset weakness in telecom services and energy shares.

Let's Encrypt Criticized Over Speedy HTTPS Certifications

100 million HTTPS certificates were issued in the last year by Let's Encrypt -- a free certificate authority founded by Mozilla, Cisco and the Electronic Frontier Foundation -- and they're now issuing more than 100,000 HTTPS certificates every day. Should they be performing more vetting? msm1267 shared this article from Kaspersky Lab's ThreatPost blog: [S]ome critics are sounding alarm bells and warning that Let's Encrypt might be guilty of going too far, too fast, and delivering too much of a good thing without the right checks and balances in place. The primary concern has been that while the growth of SSL/TLS encryption is a positive trend, it also offers criminals an easy way to facilitate website spoofing, server impersonation, man-in-the-middle attacks, and a way to sneak malware through company firewalls... Critics do not contend Let's Encrypt is responsible for these types of abuses. Rather, because it is the 800-pound gorilla when it comes to issuing basic domain validation certificates, critics believe Let's Encrypt could do a better job vetting applicants to weed out bad actors... "I think there should be some type of vetting process. That would make it more difficult for malicious actors to get them," said Justin Jett, director of audit and compliance at Plixer, a network traffic analytics firm... Josh Aas, executive director of the Internet Security Research Group, the organization that oversees Let's Encrypt, points out that its role is not to police the internet, rather its mission is to make communications secure. He added that, unlike commercial certificate authorities, it keeps a searchable public database of every single domain it issues. "When people get surprised at the number of PayPal phishing sites and get worked up about it, the reason they know about it is because we allow anyone to search our records," he said. Many other certificate authorities keep their databases of issued certificates private, citing competitive reasons and that customers don't want to broadcast the names of their servers... The reason people treat us like a punching bag is that we are big and we are transparent. " The criticism intensified after Let's Encrypt announced they'd soon offer wildcard certificates for subdomains. But the article also cites security researcher Scott Helme, who "argued if encryption is to be available to all then that includes the small percent of bad actors. 'I don't think it's for Signal, or Let's Encrypt, to decide who should have access to encryption."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

A New Sampling Algorithm Could Eliminate Sensor Saturation

Baron_Yam shared an article from Science Daily: Researchers from MIT and the Technical University of Munich have developed a new technique that could lead to cameras that can handle light of any intensity, and audio that doesn't skip or pop. Virtually any modern information-capture device -- such as a camera, audio recorder, or telephone -- has an analog-to-digital converter in it, a circuit that converts the fluctuating voltages of analog signals into strings of ones and zeroes. Almost all commercial analog-to-digital converters (ADCs), however, have voltage limits. If an incoming signal exceeds that limit, the ADC either cuts it off or flatlines at the maximum voltage. This phenomenon is familiar as the pops and skips of a "clipped" audio signal or as "saturation" in digital images -- when, for instance, a sky that looks blue to the naked eye shows up on-camera as a sheet of white. Last week, at the International Conference on Sampling Theory and Applications, researchers from MIT and the Technical University of Munich presented a technique that they call unlimited sampling, which can accurately digitize signals whose voltage peaks are far beyond an ADC's voltage limit. The consequence could be cameras that capture all the gradations of color visible to the human eye, audio that doesn't skip, and medical and environmental sensors that can handle both long periods of low activity and the sudden signal spikes that are often the events of interest. One of the paper's author's explains that "The idea is very simple. If you have a number that is too big to store in your computer memory, you can take the modulo of the number."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The US And Australia Are Testing Hypersonic Missiles

schwit1 quotes Engadget: Both the U.S. and Australia have confirmed that they recently completed a series of mysterious hypersonic missile tests. All the countries will say is that the flights were successful, and that they represented "significant milestones" in testing everything from the design assembly to the control mechanisms. They won't even say which vehicles were used or how quickly they traveled, although past tests have usually relied on Terrier Orion rockets and have reached speeds as high as Mach 8. The tests are part of the long-running HIFiRE (Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation) program, whose first launch took place way back in 2009. They should help bring hypersonic flight to a "range of applications," according to HIFiRE partner BAE. That could easily include ultra-fast aircraft, but it's widely believed the focus here is on missiles and similar unmanned weapons. A hypersonic missile would fulfill the US military's goal of building a conventional weapon that can strike anywhere within an hour, and it would be virtually impossible to stop using existing missile defenses. In theory, enemy nations wouldn't dare attack if they knew they'd face certain retaliation within minutes. Originally NASA was involved in the project, which has been ongoing for more than eight years. But it's timeline may have shortened after reports that foreign powers including Russia and China are already building their own hypersonic missiles.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Linus Torvalds Now Reviews Gadgets On Google+

An anonymous reader quotes ZDNet: If you know anything about Linus Torvalds, you know he's the mastermind and overlord of Linux. If you know him at all well, you know he's also an enthusiastic scuba diver and author of SubSurface, a do-it-all dive log program. And, if you know him really well, you'd know, like many other developers, he loves gadgets. Now, he's starting his own gadget review site on Google+: Working Gadgets... "[W]hile waiting for my current build to finish, I decided to write a note about some of the gadgets I got that turned out to work, rather than all the crazy crap that didn't. Because while 90% of the cool toys I buy aren't all that great, there's still the ones that actually do live up to expectations. So the rule is: no rants. Just good stuff. Because this is about happy gadgets." So far Linus has reviewed an automatic cat litter box, a scuba diving pressure regulator, and a Ubiquiti UniFi Wi-Fi access point that complements his Google WiFi mesh network. Linus will be great at this. Just last week I saw him recommending a text editor.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Facebook Petitioned To Change License For ReactJS

mpol writes: The Apache Software Foundation issued a notice last weekend indicating that it has added Facebook's BSD+Patents [ROCKSDB] license to its Category X list of disallowed licenses for Apache Project Management Committee members. This is the license that Facebook uses for most of its open source projects. The RocksDB software project from Facebook already changed its license to a dual Apache 2 and GPL 2. Users are now petitioning on GitHub to have Facebook change the license of React.JS as well. React.JS is a well-known and often used JavaScript Framework for frontend development. It is licensed as BSD + Patents. If you use React.JS and agreed to its license, and you decide to sue Facebook for patent issues, you are no longer allowed to use React.JS or any Facebook software released under this license.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.