No item elements found in rss feed.
bbc
No item elements found in rss feed.

At His Own Wake, Celebrating Life and the Gift of Death

Tormented by an incurable disease, John Shields knew that dying openly and without fear could be his legacy, if his doctor, friends and family helped him.

Opinion: Do We Really Want Mike Pence to Be President?

Everyone seems to be dreaming of replacing a flamboyantly unqualified man with a quietly unqualified one.

Opinion: After 54 Years, We Fell in Love. After Five Months, I Got Leukemia.

I thought it was a romantic comedy. I was wrong about the comedy.

Summer Pages: Books to Breeze Through This Summer

I thought it was a romantic comedy. I was wrong about the comedy.

Op-Ed Columnist: 11 Years Old, a Mom, and Pushed to Marry Her Rapist in Florida

Thousands of minors wed each year in the United States. Many are given no choice.

Trump Returns to Crisis Over Kushner as White House Tries to Contain It

President Trump arrived home Saturday to face reports that his son-in-law is under scrutiny in inquiries into possible ties between Russia and associates of Mr. Trump.

Zbigniew Brzezinski, National Security Adviser to Jimmy Carter, Dies at 89

Mr. Brzezinski, who guided Mr. Carter during the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, had decades of influence in global affairs.

Op-Ed Columnist: Trump’s Hand-to-Hand Combat

An ex-president is blissful; the new one is truculent. Even our allies are avoiding Donald’s clutches.

Finding My Florida

It’s a much-mocked place — but also many states in one. All of them can be fascinating and, yes, sometimes weird.

Op-Ed Columnist: The Awkward Body Language of Donald Trump

In the post-truth presidency, a gesture is worth a thousand words.

Market Snapshot: Consumer confidence, jobs to highlight packed stock-market week

Investors will surface from their long weekend to greet a data packed week as stocks push against record levels in a time of fundamental strength but political uncertainty.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq book narrow records ahead of Memorial Day weekend

The S&P 500 and the Nasdaq Composite logged tiny gains on Friday, but they were enough for the benchmarks to finish in record territory and book a seventh straight advance, ahead of the long Memorial Day weekend.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500, Nasdaq close at records as stock market extends win streak to a 6th day

The S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite close at fresh records on Thursday as U.S. stocks advanced for a sixth straight session, thanks in part to big gains in shares of Best Buy after quarterly results.

Market Snapshot: S&P 500 extends win streak to 5 sessions, posts record close

The S&P 500 extends gains for a fifth session to close at a record on Wednesday as minutes of the Federal Reserve’s latest policy meeting showed broad agreement on plans to begin shrinking the central bank’s balance sheet and also pointed to a likely rate increase next month as widely expected.

Market Snapshot: Stock market books 4th straight session of gains as banks lead the charge

.S. stocks on Tuesday struggle to add to early gains and push Wall Street’s recent climb to a fourth straight session, as investor sentiment was subdued in the wake of a Monday night terrorist attack in the U.K.

Silicon Valley Continues To Explore Universal Basic Incomes

A Silicon Valley Congressman "is pushing for a plan that has been described as a first step toward universal basic income...a long-shot $1 trillion expansion to the earned income tax credit that is already available to low-income families." An anonymous reader quotes the Mecury News: Stanford University also has created a Basic Income Lab to study the idea, and the San Francisco city treasurer's office has said it's designing pilot tests -- though the department told this news organization it has no updates on the status of that project... The problem is that giving all Americans a $10,000 annual income would cost upwards of $3 trillion a year -- more than three-fourths of the federal budget, said Bob Greenstein, president of Washington, D.C.-based Center for Budget and Policy Priorities. Some proponents advocate funding the move by cutting programs like food stamps and Medicaid. But that approach would take money set aside for low-income families and redistribute it upward, exacerbating poverty and inequality, Greenstein said... Jennifer Lin, deputy director of the East Bay Alliance for a Sustainable Economy, is skeptical that basic income can do much lasting good in Oakland. What the city needs is more high-paying jobs and affordable housing, she said... The idea, [Sam Altman, president of Y Combinator] said at the Commonwealth Club, tackles the question not enough people are asking: "What do we as the tech industry do to solve the problem that we're helping to create?" This summer Y Combinator is expected to announce a larger Universal Basic Income program, though the article also describes "small pilot studies" in the 1960s and 1970s in Canada and in several U.S. states including New Jersey, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Iowa and Indiana, where "Some studies showed improvements in participants' physical and mental health, and found children performed better in school or stayed in school longer. But some also showed that people receiving a basic income were inclined to spend fewer hours working."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Researchers Found Perfect Contraceptives In Traditional Chinese Medicine

hackingbear writes: Researchers at U.C. Berkeley found a birth control that was hormone-free, 100 percent natural, resulted in no side effects, didn't harm either eggs nor sperm, could be used in the long-term or short-term, and -- perhaps the best part of all -- could be used either before or after conception, from ancient Chinese folk medicine... "Because these two plant compounds block fertilization at very, very low concentrations -- about 10 times lower than levels of levonorgestrel in Plan B -- they could be a new generation of emergency contraceptive we nicknamed 'molecular condoms,'" team leader Polina Lishko.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Is Amazon's AWS Hiring 'Demolishing The Cult Of Youth'?

Tech analyst James Governor argues that Amazon's cloud business is "demolishing the cult of youth." It just announced it is hiring James Gosling, one of the original inventors of Java... Meanwhile James Hamilton continues to completely kick ass in compute, network, and data center design for AWS... He's in his 50s. Tim Bray, one of the inventors of XML, joined Amazon in 2014. He's another Sun alumni. He's 61 now. He still codes. When you sit down with one of the AWS engineering teams you're sitting down with grownups... Adrian Cockcroft joined AWS in October 2016. He graduated in 1982, not 2002. He is VP Cloud Architecture Strategy at AWS, a perfect role for someone that helped drive Netflix's transition from on-prem Java hairball to serious cloud leadership. Great engineering is not maths -- it involves tradeoffs, wisdom and experience... The company puts such a premium on independent groups working fast and making their own decisions it requires a particular skillset, which generally involves a great deal of field experience. A related trend is hiring seasoned marketing talent from the likes of IBM. Some other older companies have older distinguished engineers because they grew up with the company. AWS is explicitly bringing that experience in. It's refreshing to the see a different perspective on value. In a later post the analyst acknowledges engineering managers are generally older than their reports, but adds that "If AWS sees value in hiring engineering leadership from folks that are frankly a bit older than the norm in the industry, isn't that worth shining a light on?" In response to the article, XML inventor Tim Bray suggested a new acronym: GaaS. "Geezers as a service," while Amazon CTO Werner Vogels tweeted "There is no compression algorithm for experience."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

New Details On Sergey Brin's Plan For The World's Largest Aircraft

An anonymous reader shares The Guardian's report on plans for a new aircraft that's two-and-a-half times the size of a 747. Google co-founder Sergey Brin is building a hi-tech airship in Silicon Valley destined to be the largest aircraft in the world, according to multiple sources with knowledge of the project. "It's going to be massive on a grand scale," said one, adding that the airship is likely to be nearly 200 meters [656 feet] long... Brin wants the gargantuan airship, funded personally by the billionaire, to be able to deliver supplies and food on humanitarian missions to remote locations. However, it will also serve as a luxurious intercontinental "air yacht" for Brin's friends and family. One source put the project's price tag at $100m to $150m. Igor Pasternak, an airship designer who was involved in the early stages of the project, believes airships could be as revolutionary for the trillion-dollar global cargo market as the internet was for communications. "Sergey is pretty innovative and forward looking," he said. "Trucks are only as good as your roads, trains can only go where you have rails, and planes need airports. Airships can deliver from point A to point Z without stopping anywhere in between." The Guardian quips that while Brin's plans may stay secret for a while, "the good news is that the first flight test of such an enormous aircraft will be impossible to hide."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Even For Businesses, Chrome Is The Top Browser

An anonymous reader shares Computerworld's interview with David Michael Smith of Gartner. "Most enterprises still have a 'standard' browser, and most of the time, that's something from Microsoft. These days it's IE11. But we've found that people actually use Chrome more than IE... It's the most-used browser in enterprise," he said... IE retains a sizable share -- Smith called it "a significant presence" -- largely because it's still required in most companies. "There are a lot of [enterprise] applications that only work in IE, because [those apps] use plug-ins," Smith said, ticking off examples like Adobe Flash, Java and Microsoft's own Silverlight. "Anything that requires an ActiveX control needs IE." Many businesses have adopted the two-prong strategy that Gartner and others began recommending years ago: Keep a "legacy" browser to handle older sites, services and web apps, but offer another for everything else... Chrome, said Smith, is now the "overwhelming choice" as the modern enterprise browser... Smith wasn't optimistic that Edge would supplant Chrome, even when Windows 10 is widely deployed on corporate computers in the next few years. "Edge certainly will have opportunities" once Windows 10 is the enterprise-standard OS, "but I would say that Chrome has a lot of momentum, largely for the fact that it is so popular on the internet." While a year ago Chrome and Microsoft's browsers both held 41% of the browser market share, now Chrome holds 59% to just 24% for both IE and Edge combined.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.